EU resettlement

Resettlement means shifting of refugees from a country of asylum to another one admit them with a long-term course may be concluded with a permanent settlement or naturalization. States that accept to conduct those programs are expected to provide a protection framework invigorated by political. economic, social, and cultural rights. The programs should meet the specific needs of individual refugees whose fundamental rights are at risk in the country where they have sought refuge. It is not an international legal obligation for countries but this is related to a moral burden involved in an intention to promoting sustainable peace in the world.

It is also an enunciation of solidarity with developing countries like Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon that receive the larger part of the whole refugees. According to UNHCR sources, in 2016, only one percent of 16.1 million refugees were resettled that year. So, there is an enormous gap between what is needed and what is already done. Resettlement is accepted as a durable solution for displaced people with a successful integration or voluntary repatriation, returning to the homeland.

Resettlement embodies the crux of the general EU asylum policy. Thus and so, the claim of unification of common European policies would be tested. In the European context, the term means a translocation from a member of the EU to another. Member states work together for aspects of refugee resettlement, setting common resettlement priorities, developing funding instruments, and collaborating practically through the European Asylum Support Office (EASO) and the European Resettlement Network.Defenseless people against severe threats are tried to be protected from the criminal networks human-smuggling. Therefore, EU institutions aim to set up safe and legal routes to reach the EU. In 2012, the UNHCR Deputy Director has endorsed a purpose of 20,000 resettlement places for the EU per year by the year 2020.

Defenseless people against severe threats are tried to be protected from the criminal networks human-smuggling. Therefore, EU institutions aim to set up safe and legal routes to reach the EU. In 2012, the UNHCR Deputy Director has endorsed a purpose of 20,000 resettlement places for the EU per year by the year 2020.

“This is a true expression of European solidarity in action, which comes in addition to the enormous efforts made by the Member States to receive and host over 1,2 million asylum seekers in 2015 alone. With tens of thousands of refugees in Greece waiting to be relocated and arrivals remaining at a high level in Italy, this positive trend now needs to be continued and strengthened. The Commission will continue to support the Member States by all available means to further accelerate the implementation of the relocation and resettlement schemes.” Commissioner for Migration, Home Affairs and Citizenship, Dimitris Avramopoulos
Refugees resettled in Denmark, Germany, Iceland, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania and Spain can take the temporary residence permit. Also, they can demand a permanent residency after a period of legal residency. In this case, they are supposed to satisfy some conditions like language learning, civic knowledge, financial independence, and so forth. After they arrive in the new country, they have the right to reside so there is no need to apply for asylum. All European countries provide an opportunity for appeal to citizenship for permanent residents, after varying term of residency and expected to satisfy some conditions abovementioned.

 

Relocation refers to the movement of people who are in clear need of international protection from one EU Member State to another. In 2011, ten Member States have accepted 227 refugees relocated from Malta via Intra-EU Relocation from Malta Project (EUREMA). In a second phase of the project in 2012, 7 Member States pledged 86 places. A further 8 collectively pledged to receive 233 refugees via bilateral agreements with Malta.
In May 2015 the Commission proposed a European Resettlement Scheme which was adopted by the Council in July 2015. According to the scheme, 22,000 people have been resettled from outside of the EU to the Member States.

We need to move up a gear in our common efforts to provide international protection, and that includes resettling refugees in Europe in a safe and orderly way. Ad-hoc schemes have delivered some results so far, but the new procedures put on the table today mean that we will work with national governments at an early stage to increase and pool efforts and make this work better,” said First Vice-President Frans Timmermans. “The Member States will decide how many people need to be resettled each year, and they will have the financial support of the EU budget to turn their decisions into action. This is an effective way for the EU to live up to its collective responsibility to show solidarity with non-EU countries and help them cope with large numbers of people fleeing war and persecution.”

By the year 2016, the latest report on Sep 28 shows that 10,695 people have been resettled within the EU under the 1:1 mechanism with Turkey. It is based on the EU-Turkey Joint-Action Plan, the readmission agreement. Under this plan, for every Syrian refugee returned from the Greek islands another will be resettled to the EU directly from camps in Turkey. This was also called 1:1 mechanism that aims to prevent irregular migration across the Aegean Sea by a legal resettlement process.

 

Featured Photo: Dado Ruvic/Reuters